Restricted Inputs for Soil-Based Produce

Fertility and Soil Amendments

  • High salt content fertilizers such as sodium nitrate (Chilean nitrate), potassium sulfate, potassium chloride: must have a plan to limit salt accumulation and prevent excessive runoff. 
  • Raw manure – Raw, or uncomposted manure, must be applied to the soil with adequate time before harvest of crops to make sure it breaks down entirely. This is 90 days where the edible portion of the crop does not come into contact with the soil (ie tree fruit, trellised tomatoes) and 120 days where the edible portion of the crop does come into contact with the soil (ie lettuce, carrots).
  • Synthetic micronutrients – use is permitted if there is a documented deficiency
    NOTE: Micronutrients— may only be used for fertility, and there must be a documented deficiency in the form of a soil or tissue test. Micronutrients made from nitrates or chlorides are prohibited.

This applies to the following nutrients:

    • Soluble Boron products
    • Sulfates  of zinc, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, and cobalt.
    • Carbonates  of zinc, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, and cobalt.
    • Oxides  of zinc, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, and cobalt.
    • Silicates of zinc, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, and cobalt

NOTES: 

  • Micronutrients— may only be used for fertility, and there must be a documented deficiency in the form of a soil or tissue test. 
  • Micronutrients made from nitrates or chlorides are prohibited.
  • If a grower does not have a documented deficiency, but still wants to add micronutrients to their soil, they can look into a CNG approved product, such as azomite.

Plant Pests and Diseases

General use of Plant Pest Products 

Approved plant pest products are allowed with the use of preventive, mechanical, physical, and other pest management practices, so that spraying is not the first and only line of defense. Some examples of pest management practices include: crop rotation, cultivating beneficial insect habitat, releasing beneficial insects trap cropping, pest monitoring, manual removal, and selecting pest resistant varieties, among others.

General use of Plant Disease Products

Approved plant disease products are allowed with the use of preventive, mechanical, physical, and other disease management practices, so that spraying is not the first and only line of defense. Some examples of disease management practices include: crop rotation, selecting disease resistant varieties, precision irrigation, pruning and trellising, manual removal, and crop diversification, among others.

  • Boric acid—Must not come into direct contact with food or crops
  • Copper – must be used in a manner that prevents accumulation in the soil
  • Soaps ‐non‐detergent only (such as a castille or insecticidal soap); for food crops only; as a pesticide, fungicide, or algaecide. 
    • NOTE: If used as herbicide, must be used only on non‐food plants or around buildings, roadways, etc. Cannot be used for disease control.

Weed Management and Miscellaneous

General use of Herbicide Products

Approved herbicide products are allowed with the use of preventive, mechanical, physical, and other weed management practices, so that spraying is not the first and only line of defense. Some examples of weed management practices include: cultivation, hand pulling, mowing, timely weeding, mulching, tarp occultation, and flame weeding, among others.

  • Herbicidal soaps – must not come into contact with crops, only for controlling weeds around buildings and roadways 

If you'd prefer to print this out, here is a Restricted Inputs PDF